Avoiding issues with Property Transactions

GST issues relating to Partial Use

We commonly come across errors around accounting for GST on property transactions and their financial impact can be significant for the parties involved. Following on from our discussion around whether there is GST or not on property transactions let us now look at the GST impact around partial use when purchasing property.

By law, GST is charged on all land sales and claimed on all land purchases. Exceptions being when that property is used for making non-taxable supplies such as Residential accommodation or the transaction is compulsory zero-rated.

From 1st April 2011 new apportionment rules were introduced requiring suppliers of land or supplies that include land to charge GST on the supply at the rate of zero percent where the purchaser intends to use the land to make taxable supplies.

However, what happens in the case of transactions where there is both a residential and economic activity component to the property transaction. Inland Revenue allows for the apportionment into two distinct supplies for GST Purposes. Each component must be valued separately and be considered independently to determine what GST is payable or receivable.

Let’s consider the following example:

Sarah purchases a new building for $5 million on 30th October 2017. Sarah has a balance date of 31st March. There is no GST included in the supply as it is subject to the zero-rating rules.

Where both the vendor and purchaser are registered for GST AND the purchaser declares on Schedule 2 of the ADLS/REINZ Sale and Purchase Agreement (S&PA) that they intend to use the building for making taxable supplies AND the purchaser does not intend at the time of settlement to use the property as a principal place of residence. Then under Clause 15 of the S&PA it will become compulsory for the transaction to be zero-rated for GST purposes.

Sarah intends the building to be mixed-use and to lease the ground and first floor of the building to commercial tenants, and the 2nd floor of the building will be leased to residential tenants.

On acquisition, Sarah applies the rules in section 20(3I) of the GST Act 1985.

  1. Calculate the nominal tax component that would be chargeable on the value of the supply if subject to the standard rate of GST.

$5m x 15% = $750,000

2. Determine the extent to which the building will be used for making taxable supplies.

a.Sarah determines that the building will be used 66.7% for making taxable supplies (rent to commercial tenants) and 33.3% in making exempt supplies (rent to residential tenants).

3. Sarah now needs to account for the proportion of the nominal GST component that relates to the non-taxable use of the goods as output tax on the acquisition of the building.

a.$750,000 x 33.3% = $249,750

4. On the acquisition of the building, Sarah will need to account for output tax of $249,750.

The same principals would apply to transactions where there is both a residential and economic activity as in the case of Farms (Rural farms, lifestyle farms, and orchards), Vacant land where residential use is planned, land used for a Dairy, or hotels and motels where the owner or manager lives onsite.

The rules require the taxpayers to make a fair and reasonable estimate on the intended taxable and non-taxable components of the initial transaction. In subsequent periods after the initial tax deduction claimed the taxpayer may be required to make further adjustments if the actual taxable use of an asset was different to its intended taxable use.

The first adjustment period runs from the date of acquisition (30th October 2017) to the persons first balance date after acquisition or to the person’s first balance date that falls at least 12 months after the date of acquisition. In Sarah’s example, this would either be 31st March 2018 or 31st March 19. Subsequent adjustment periods would run annually from this point.

In our example, Sarah elects to go with option 1 the period 30th October 2017 to 31st March 2018. Her second adjustment period will run from 1st April 2018 to 31st March 2019. There is no limit to the number of adjustment periods in relation to land.

Using our example, Sarah would be required to keep records showing the usage for both the taxable and non-taxable portions. These logs form the basis to make an annual adjustment if the percentages differ or there is a change in use.

This document has been written as a general guide and should not be used or relied upon as a substitute for specific professional advice.

 

Are you avoiding issues with Property Transactions – What happens around GST?

Whether there is GST or not on property transactions gives rise to a lot of confusion. The implications if you do get it wrong can cause serious ramifications for both parties to the agreement – think 15% of the purchase price. We are talking hundreds of thousands if not millions of dollars.

The standard ADLS/REINZ Sale and Purchase Agreement for Real Estate in New Zealand (currently ninth edition 2012 (7)) has highlighted the need to ask questions around GST. The agreement does make things slightly easier as long as the form is filled in correctly. We have put together this basic overview as a starting point.

Let’s set out the basics firstly from the Vendors Point of View. To be able to register for GST the vendor is not using the land for their principal place of residence and instead is using the land for making “taxable supplies”. Examples could be:

Taxable Supply for GST purposes
Long Term residential letting NO
Short term letting where you receive a rate per night. For example – Airbnb YES
Commercial Lease of a building YES
Farming (but there are exceptions) YES

If the vendor does make a taxable supply and has registered for GST, then they need to show this on the Sale and Purchase Agreement by:

Respond YES to the question asking whether the Vendor is registered under the GST Act in respect of the transaction evidenced by the agreement and or will be so registered at settlement This question is located at the top of Page 1 of the Agreement
The purchase price must be shown as “plus GST (if any)” Located on Page 1 of the Agreement. This averts the possible problem if the purchaser nominates a non-GST registered entity after signing. Meaning the vendor would still need to account for 15% of the purchase price to the Inland Revenue, and ends up getting 15% less of the sale as a result of the Purchaser’s actions.
The Vendors GST registration number is to be entered in under Schedule 2 of the agreement.

If the vendor is not registered for GST, then they respond NO to the question asking whether the Vendor is registered under the GST Act in respect of the transaction evidenced by the agreement and or will be so registered at settlement and they do not have to fill out Schedule 2.

Secondly if the purchaser is GST registered then they need to state this in Schedule 2 answering all questions 3 to 11. If they are not registered, then they would answer questions 3 and 4of schedule 2 as NO.

 

Let’s look at some possible scenarios

Vendor GST Registered Purchaser GST Registered
NO NO 1.      No GST on the sale

2.      the Vendor must answer NO on the front page to confirm they are not GST registered.

3.      The price can be shown as either Plus GST (if any) or inclusive of GST (if any) or if neither is crossed out it automatically defaults to Inclusive of GST (if any). In reality it makes no difference.

YES NO 1.      The vendor must answer Yes on the front page to confirm they are GST registered.

2.      The price must be shown as Inclusive of GST (if any). This way the vendor can only be better off if the Purchaser Registers.

3.      Questions 1 and 2 must be answered on Schedule 2

NO YES 1.      the Vendor must answer NO on the front page to confirm they are not GST registered.

2.      The price to be shown as inclusive of GST (if any)

3.      The purchaser can claim the GST in their GST return as they pay for the property (irrespective of their actual GST registration basis).

YES YES 1.      Where both parties are GST registered AND the purchaser declares on Schedule 2 that they intend to use the property for making taxable supplies AND the purchaser does not intend at the time of settlement to use the property as a principal place of residence then under Clause 15 it will become compulsory for the transaction to be zero rated for GST purposes.

Yet, let’s consider what happens when the GST status of one of the parties to the transaction changes prior to the settlement date. If the purchasers GST status changes they are required under clause 14 to provide the vendor with no later than 2 days prior to settlement for the correct position to be recorded on the settlement statement. The relevant date for GST status is taken from the status of the parties at the date of settlement.

In the next edition of Covisory Connect we will address GST issues around partial use and change in use. As always, we would advise that you seek specialist legal and tax advice when faced with GST.

 

 

Values

Values play a fundamental part in any business. Having a central core of four or five values means that they are easy to communicate to both your employees and your clients. These values are a central part of who you are – and who you want to be.

At Covisory we focus on a core of 5 values:

  1. Integrity – it is about doing the right thing at all times and all circumstances whether or not someone is watching.
  2. Accountability – a willingness to take responsibility for one’s own actions.
  3. Diligence – this is not about drudgery it’s about asking the right questions, emphasising people’s strengths and a philosophy of perpetual quality improvement both on a personal and business perspective.
  4. Perseverance – being in it for the long term, exercising judgement and reflecting a sense of confidence and determination in all that we do.
  5. Discipline – this is not about following orders, it is about people thinking on their feet, attention to detail and solving problems effectively.

Values are fundamental to motivating and sustaining people’s behaviour over the long term. By emphasising these core values, other positive values flourish. They help people to adjust to the ever changing priorities and demands in today’s business, and they help businesses to sustain competitiveness.

By becoming more aware of these important factors, you can use them as a guide to make the best choice in any situation.

Do you need help with Relationship Property Disputes or Trust Conflicts?

Do you need any support with…

  • Relationship Property Analysis
  • Forensic Accounting
  • Valuations of Business Interests
  • Independent Trustees Services

We do understand from our experience that there are times that you or someone at your firm needs someone like us who stands independent from each party.

We can cut through the mountains of data for you to find out what really went on and appraise you of your client’s potential claims or defences.

In the past we have been called in to stand as a court appointed independent trustee in order to protect the trust assets from disputing spouses or factions. We have found that the independence of a privately appointed trustee or advisory trustee is all that is needed. The Covisory team can assist you with this and other related services.

You can find us online at www.covisory.com. Contact Nigel Smith or Barry Tuck to find out how we can help you or your clients solve your problems.

How Can Covisory Management Help You and Your Business Needs?

At Covisory Management we are outcome focussed and have a practical business approach. We work both directly with private clients and with Chartered Accountants, Lawyers,  and Banks as a specialist high level consultant. Our specialities are around Trusts and Business Advisory services.  If you would like to know more about how Covisory Management can help you please contact Barry Tuck.

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