Some Important Information for Kiwis from Tuesday’s Australian Federal Budget.

On Tuesday 9th May, the Australian Federal Government released its latest budget. It was an attempt to squeeze more blood out of a stone and to try to balance its books.
Kiwi’s seem to have recently borne the brunt of the Australian Government’s attempts to balance its books with the removal of subsidised Australian university education as an example. The budget yesterday takes this a few more steps further and there are a couple of very important points that our clients need to be aware of:

1. Depreciation restrictions – it is proposed that for properties acquired subsequent to the budget, it will no longer be possible to depreciate plant and equipment apportioned out of the purchase price i.e. chattel split out. Previously there has been an ability to apportion out a part of the purchase price for a commercial property or commercial residential property and claim depreciation on the chattels at higher depreciation rates than building rates. In New Zealand, we continue to be able to depreciate these even though we cannot claim building depreciation.

Existing properties in Australia will be grandfathered. In future where a building is acquired, it will no longer be possible to apportion out the property, plant and equipment. However, where a property owner does spend money on these actual capital items, then they will still be entitled to depreciation.

2. Foreign residents and foreign temporary migrants – individuals who are foreign residents or foreign temporary migrants residing in Australia will no longer be eligible for the principal family home exemption from capital gains tax. When New Zealanders enter Australia, they generally enter as foreign temporary migrants (refer our “Tax Free Sunshine” paper on our Covisory website for the full background).
For foreign residents and temporary migrants moving to Australia from today’s date or acquiring a property after this date, they will no longer be eligible for the exemption. Those already in Australia with existing properties will be grandfathered until June 2019. However, it is not clear whether at June 2019 the properties will then be subject to capital gains tax from that point on subject to a valuation or the whole of the gain up to that point in time will fall to be subject to capital gains tax. More details to follow.

Naturally as Kiwi’s enter Australia as foreign temporary migrants, they are effectively permanently temporary. There is no comment yet from the Australian Government about whether New Zealanders will be specifically excluded from the removal of the principal residence exemption.

We will be arranging to have one of our Australian colleagues come to New Zealand in the next few months to run some specific updates for clients that are affected. In the meanwhile, if you are affected by these changes, please do not hesitate to contact us.