With another 31st December rolling on by Covisory turned 10 years old. Over the holidays my youngest 20+ child quizzed me on whether I had any resolutions for 2017. This led to some interesting conversations on the concept of reflection.

I’m not one of those people who each year makes resolutions. I freely admit that the cynic in me watches to see how long the resolutions of others will last in the coming year. We all know the routine firstly you fall for the line that it’s a new year so you need to make resolutions. You start with good intentions but as life encroaches, those resolutions either drift off into the too hard basket or are just forgotten.

These easy to make, on the spur of the moment, influenced by what is the latest trends are doomed to fail. Why? New Year Resolutions have on the most part no meaning. People expect to fail with them, there are no consequences on them if the result is not achieved.

Making resolutions is not the problem it is the built-in expectation to fail. If we live our business and personal lives without reflecting on our past experiences, we are bound to make the same mistakes. We cannot break through barriers by doing more of the same. Not only must we invest in action we also should work on deep and sustained reflection on an ongoing basis and not just once a year. Reflecting will not solve all the problems but it will help move you a tiny bit closer.

Let’s face it life is busy these days. We are all guilty of spending a lot of our time chasing the immediate reward, the near-term “goal” — in short, the expedient and the convenient. We are all obsessed with doing. What we are not so good at is stopping and taking a hard look at Why and What we are doing. Reflection may be a tool talked about in education but there is little application when we move into the workforce. Why not – are we afraid of what we will find?

If a business is not doing well it is easier to cast blame for problems on difficult customers or an investor. Alternatively, maybe we look to blame the government bodies regulating the industry, or competitors and who hasn’t blamed the computer or an application for our failures? We do not automatically ask in a situation what am I doing wrong or right? How could I improve? Our culture allows us to avoid personal responsibility – we are guilty of not owning problems or to finding ways to solve them.

If we do not take time out of our week, month or year to make room for the deep questions and thinking we fail to grow. We opt for the distracting items that fill our time. It is not about working harder. We need to work smarter and this means having the time for reflection so that we can make changes and improve on past performance.

Breakthroughs to a product, a company, a market or industry do not come from being busy and jumping between multiple tasks. Change comes from an opportunity to have structured periods of reflection. We need time to ponder, to question, to model, and to research. Reflection drives experimentation and sparks innovation. By reviewing the processes and results we add to our understanding, gain insight and allow companies to respond to change. By taking the opportunity to reflect we can make our businesses radically better.

In today’s culture, we as individuals and businesses are engineered to Do, we have not been encouraged to reflect. To add reflection to our lives allows us to embed concepts and theories into our practices. It fosters constant thought and innovation that provides the means to allow us to grow as both individuals and professionals.

Within Covisory ‘Reflection’ is a core component of how we operate both internally and when we work with customers. If you need assistance, we are always happy to support you with this process. Please Contact Us. With a new year before us let 2017 be the year to not only learn from our experiences but regularly reflect on those experiences.

I will leave you with the words of Margaret J. Wheatley an American writer and management consultant:

“Without reflection, we go blindly on our way, creating more unintended consequences, and failing to achieve anything useful.”